Things to Avoid 7: Waste (戒暴殄)

戒單::戒暴殄
暴者不恤人功,殄者不惜物力。雞、魚、鵝、鴨,自首至尾,俱有味存,不必少取多棄也。嘗見烹甲魚者,專取其裙而不知味在肉中;蒸鰣魚者,專取其肚而不知鮮在背上。至賤莫如醃蛋,其佳處雖在黃不在白,然全去其白而專取其黃,則食者亦覺索然矣。且予為此言,並非俗人借福之謂,假使暴殄而有益於飲食,猶之可也。暴殄而反累於飲食,又何苦為之?至於烈炭以炙活鵝之掌,剸刀以取生雞之肝,皆君子所不為也。何也?物為人用,使之死可也,使之求死不得不可也。

List of Things to Avoid::Waste
Tyrannical individuals are not emphatic to people’s labours, just as wasteful individuals care little about the value of things. From head to tail, all parts of a chicken, fish, goose, or duck are delicious in their own way. As such, there is no need to carve out the best part of something only to relegate the rest as waste. One often sees soft-shell turtle being prepared by portioning off the “skirt” [1] while the rest of the turtle with its fragrant meat was discarded. It is also not uncommon to see the belly of a shad [2] sliced-off and reserved for steaming without considering the fact that the best flavour comes from its dorsal parts. By far the most common example of pointless waste can be found in some chef’s preparation of salted eggs. The yolk of a salted egg is inarguably its best part, with its white ranking a distant second. But discard the whites and serve only the yolk and the eating experience would not feel half as enjoyable.[3]

This is not to say that I champion the commoner’s ideas of conserving every part of an ingredient. Quite the opposite, if the “waste” of part of an ingredient can greatly enhance the resulting dish, then all the better.[4] But if one purposefully discards the portions of an ingredient to the detriment of a dish, then what is the point indeed?

As for the practice of roasting the feet of live geese or cutting out the liver of live chicken for the sake of gastronomy, such are foods that a gentlemen should never partake. Why?[5] Taking the life of a creature for food can be justified, but doing so in a way that it begs for death is unjustifiable.[6]

Random notes:
[1]: The “shell” of a soft-shell turtle is actually covered in skin and hard only in the center. The edges of this dome is a fatty and fleshy skirt that many consider to be the choice portion of a soft-shell turtle. I have no idea if this is truly the case since I’ve never had soft-shell turtle.

[2]: Tenualosa reevesii (Reeves’ Shad). Supposedly chocked full of spiny bones.

[3]: When I was a kid, I used to peel the flavourful and chewy cheese-enveloped toppings off a slice of pizza before eating the crust. Nowadays, you would have a tough time making me eat pizza without the crust. That said, eating the toppings alone may be justified if the crust is really that terrible. For an excuse to eat melted cheese (more or less) straight, I now go for a nice “pull” of truffade or aligot. Oh, and [ NY-Style >> Chicago-Style]; the latter is at best a terrible attempt at being neither pizza nor pie. Note this is in regards to American-style pizza. To the Italian readers, ignore everything you’ve read in this note.

[4]: I have a tough time thinking up an example of this. For animals, almost all parts are good for eating save the horns, hooves and teeth. Meat aside, the bones make great stock, tendons are delectable when stewed, and cartilage make fun cold dishes with enjoyable textures. By all means, count me in as one of the uncouth commoners.

[5]: Judging by this question, it appears that such dishes were not uncommon at the lavish feasts attended by those who would consider themselves “gentlemen” (JunZi). This sadistic habit had likely stemmed from the perversion of the idea of avoiding delays. After all, what can be fresher and more nutritious than meat cut from an animal while it’s still screaming and alive! Right? Sadly, it seems this rather nasty and inhumane practice is still widely found in East Asia: just google “live sashimi”. It’s hard to imagine that there are people who actually enjoy this tasteless spectacle.

[6]: OMG! Is this the first recorded instance of Chinese animal welfare activism? Could Yuan Mei be the original Chinese animal rights advocate?

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