Pork 15: Tuosha Pork (脫沙肉)

持牲單::脫沙肉
去皮切碎,每一斤用雞子三個,青黃俱用,調和拌肉,再斬碎;入秋油半酒杯,蔥末拌勻,用網油一張裹之;外再用菜油四兩,煎兩面,起出去油;用好酒一茶杯,清醬半酒杯悶透,提起切片;肉之面上加韭菜、香蕈、筍丁。

A few centuries after Yuan Mei and half-way around the world, we see Czech meatloaf being prepared in almost the exact same manner as Tousha pork. It seems different cultures happen to come upon the same culinary techniques over and over again. (Credit: Michal Klajban)

Pork(List of the Ceremonial Animal)::Tuosha Pork [1]
Take a chunk of pork, remove the skin and chop the meat until it is thoroughly minced. For each jin of pork stir in the yolks and whites of three chicken eggs, then mash the mixture until its texture is fine and smooth. Mix in half a wine cup of autumn sauce and chopped green onion, then wrap this mixture in a large sheet of caul fat. Pan fry the wrapped meat in four liang of vegetable oil until both sides are done and remove it from the wok.

Unwrap the meat [2] and simmer it gently in one tea cup of good wine and half a wine cup of light soy sauce. Remove it from the wok, slice, and finish with a topping of garlic chives, shitake mushrooms, and cubes of bamboo shoots.

Random notes:

[1]: Despite its fancy name, this is basically Chinese-styled meatloaf.

[2]: I believe this step of removing the wrapper around the cooked meat is the namesake of the dish. “Tuosha” (脫沙) literally means “removing the layer of sand” and is used by jade hunters to describe removing the outer sandy/hazy layer on a chunk of raw jade. Removing the crusty fried caul fat would have this effect. Another interpretation is that “sand” (沙) in this case may be a shorthand for gauze(紗布), which would refer to the gauzy caul fat used in the preparation of the dish that has to be removed before finishing and serving, hence lifting the gauze. Yet another interpretation, would be that the “sand” (沙)acutally refers to a veil (面紗), and thus the name of this dish would be “lifting the veil”. A name wih slight flirtatious connotations?

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s